Business

Broadband speeds in Cornwall still MUCH slower than national average despite £17m EU project

Cornwall and Devon are among the worst performing counties in terms of broadband speed in the UK, data from the County Council network has shown. The result is coming after Cornwall announced a £17million project to boost connectivity and make the county one of the fastest broadband locations in the UK.

The Superfast Cornwall delivered a fiber-based network of about 90% of premises which now offer a broadband speed of over 24 Mbps. This is, however, nearly 20Mbps slower than the UK approved average.

Devon has an average download speed of 29Mbps.

Here are the worst and best connecting counties for average broadband according to the County Council Network

The worst performing counties

  1. Herefordshire
  2. Cornwall
  3. Somerset

The best performing counties for average broadband speed are:

  1. Hertfordshire
  2. Nottinghamshire
  3. Surrey

According to Mark Pocock, home comms expert at broadbandchoices.co.uk, “Whilst the research gives a broad stroke picture of the UK, a lot of consumers are still in the dark when it comes to the actual service and speed they will personally receive until after they have signed up for a deal. Broadbandchoices has been lobbying for some time to inform consumer purchasing, using things like the postcode checker tool, to ensure that in the face of different reports about performance they will get a clear and honest picture of the position their home or business is in.

“The chancellor has previously likened broadband to the modern equivalent of what roads were in the 20th century, calling it the ‘network infrastructure that will make this country work’ and this is not hyperbole. Access to technology is a staple requirement and reliance on high-quality connectivity will only increase. There was good news in the Autumn statement that there will be a £200 million investment into superfast broadband that will start by targeting some of the most poorly served areas in the county including the borderlands and the Welsh Valleys, will have a massive impact on those communities.”

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